Pink jellyfish invade the Philippines as beaches have become deserted during the coronavirus

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Pink jellyfish invade the Philippines by the THOUSANDS as beaches have become deserted during the coronavirus pandemic

  • The Philippines is under lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic
  • One of the most visited beaches is now deserted, allowing nature to flourish
  • A biologist witnessed thousands of pink jellyfish floating on the ocean’s surface

The beaches of Palawan, Philippines were once a tour destination, but are now deserted amid the coronavirus pandemic allowing nature to flourish along the coastline.

Biologists have witnessed thousands of pink jellyfish in the ocean that have been absent for years due to the human activity inland.

Nicknamed ‘sea tomato’, these creatures are now rising to the surface because they no long feel threatened in their natural habit, as some experts speculate the jellyfish may have stayed closer to the bottom of the sea due to the presence of tourist.

However,  Sheldon Rey Boco, a PhD candidate in marine biology at Griffith University, Australia who spotted the bloom noted more research needs to be done in order to determine this phenomenon. 

The Philippines is under lockdown due to the virus that has killed about 100 people and infected over 2,300 since the outbreak was confirmed on January 30 in the country.

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Biologists have witnessed thousands of pink jellyfish in the ocean that have been absent for years due to the human activity inland

Nicknamed 'sea tomato', these creatures are now rising to the surface because they no long feel threatened in their natural habit

Biologists have witnessed thousands of pink jellyfish in the ocean that have been absent for years due to the human activity inland

The coronavirus (COVID-19) first began in Wuhan, China December 2019 and quickly spread to the rest of the world.

More than 937,500 cases have been reported around the world and the death toll has surpassed 47,200. 

Sheldon Rey Boco, a PhD candidate in marine biology at Griffith University, Australia, shared a video he said was taken on March 23 in Corong Corong Beach in El Nido, Palawan, as reported on by Newsweek.

‘Jellyfish certainly are not affected by #COVID19 restrictions,’ Boco shared in a tweet linked to the video.

Sheldon Rey Boco, a marine biology at Griffith University, Australia, shared a video he said was taken on March 23 in Corong Corong Beach in El Nido, Palawan

'Jellyfish certainly are not affected by #COVID19 restrictions,' Boco shared in a tweet linked to the video

Sheldon Rey Boco, a PhD candidate in marine biology at Griffith University, Australia, shared a video he said was taken on March 23 in Corong Corong Beach in El Nido, Palawan

‘These hundreds or thousands of medusae are probably present in late January or February but because of wind, current and tidal conditions, they only seem to appear during March in Palawan,’ he said, Manila Bulletin reported. 

‘The atmosphere, water velocity, current, tide and even geological features of the bay or any body of water can influence the occurrence of medusae and their blooms.’

Boco added: ‘There are years when blooms or populations of a jellyfish are high and there are also years when they are few or even almost absent.’

He also noted that more research will need to be conducted in order to to fully determine what is causing this phenomenon.

Benny Antiporda of the The Philippines’ Department of Environment and Natural Resources told Business Mirror that the bloom may have brought in by currents and the lockdown has prevented residents of the area to hunt the creatures.

The coronavirus (COVID-19) first began in Wuhan, China December 2019 and quickly spread to the rest of the world. More than 937,500 cases have been reported around the world and the death toll has surpassed 47,200

The coronavirus (COVID-19) first began in Wuhan, China December 2019 and quickly spread to the rest of the world. More than 937,500 cases have been reported around the world and the death toll has surpassed 47,200

Marine biologist Dr. Ryan Baring told Newsweek that the jellyfish could have been sitting closer to the seafloor in order to avoid the numerous tourist that flock to the area.

Now, that the beaches are empty, the jellyfish no longer feel threatened and are able to swim freely, he explained.

Climate experts have theorized that jellyfish are vital to improving climate change.

According to the World Economic Forum, the creatures flourish in waters with lower oxygen levels. 

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